36. Combo chemo – 7 days on and counting, and still not dead yet!

Sorry, if anyone has been left wondering, was that Glen Frey blog his last one, or not? Clearly it wasn’t. This is one of those more mundane updates – what I ate, what I ate next… you know the sort of thing! However, the interim has not been uneventful so read on if you don’t mind a preponderance of domestic-type stuff.

The administration of my Chemo cocktail went like a dream: cannula – straight in; flushing – all good; first up – the red stuff (Epirubicin), and ‘cos you can see it you know you are now less likely to die from excessive, trapped air bubbles; more successful flushing and then on to the arch-enemy, Oxaliplatin (it wins every time, by the way). I reach the last 30 minutes of the 2-hour administration and by then I need a heat pack to protect my injection site, and I’m already feeling a little queasy. Here we go again! However, before I know it out comes the cannula, Elastoplast affixed and I’m good to go. Only three hours in total expended, so we are on our way by 13:00h – yippee!

The next two days were pretty good, probably due to the 4 dexamethasone pills (strong steroid) I am given to take first thing on both mornings, ostensibly to boost my resistance to the Chemo onslaught. They seem to work! Friday morning is a little dodgier, and I’m now on my own as Elaine headed off, via Edinburgh (for more shopping), to pick up daughter, Ellen, in Glasgow to bring her ‘home’ for the weekend. They duly arrive at around 8:30pm together with a Chinese take-away for three of us. They get a shock as they suddenly realise they haven’t catered for four and yet, larger than life, there sits Brad (my best friend who had called around for a chat) sipping a nice Single Malt whilst we “right the world”, listening to Robin Trower (another blast from my 70s past). I reassure them their share of the food spoils is safe, as Brad has already eaten. Phew!

Robin Trower Montage

Robin Trower, ex- Procol Harum, and leader of his own trio.  l to r: in his young days, his later years, Live in 1974 playing “Bridge of Sighs”, a UK TV Appearance. Accessed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tLsFsGxLmE on 27 January 2016.

We were enjoying the second album, “Bridge of Sighs” from the first volume of a bargain-priced 5 album collection which was playing at the time – and very nice too. If you like your music loud and heavy (I do too!) then AC-DC is your band (“Highway to Hell” comes to mind).

AC DC 1

But if you like your guitar sounds, as I often prefer them, with “space and air” around the notes, then look no further than Robin Trower – just brilliant. And interestingly, King King seem to have adopted a not dissimilar style – hence, I suspect, they lead my favourite new Blues-Rock band of the 2010 decade, for now!

King King 2

King King, led by Alan Nimmo, lead guitar and vocals, here playing live – Kilt-rock! Accessed at https://www.facebook.com/kingkingalannimmo/ on 27 January 2016.

Returning to matters in hand – Friday Night. Eating the takeaway was put on hold and all four of us then put even more of the “world to rights” for another half hour prior to Brad leaving to re-unite with his family, most of which were now in bed and the other tapping her foot, no doubt! Afterwards we did our best to complicate sharing three main meal takeaways where Meal A and B appealed to only one person; Meal B and C appealed to another and Meal C and A looked more than attractive to the other. No-one wanted less than half of the main meal they had ordered for themselves but no one wanted any less than a proper third of the total spoils. To achieve this was some feat given that A was Chicken Chow Mein; B was Chicken Satay and C was Chicken Egg Foo Yong. And there were two portions of egg-fried rice as well as the soft noodles (from the Chow Mein) also to be shared. But we did it!

I met up with a couple of Masons (not my namesake ones) in Lodge 25 on South Street, St Andrews to be ‘screen-interviewed’ for potential membership of this very ancient lodge (25th Oldest in Scotland). The Grand Lodge in Edinburgh is Number 1 and the Kilwinning Lodge is Number 2, and so on. I am also considering the Cupar ‘O Fife Freemasons’ Lodge (Number 19), at least it is a few miles closer to home here in Ceres.

Grand Lodges ScotlandAccessed at http://www.grandlodgescotland.com/ 27 January 2016.

I have become intrigued with Masons and Freemasonry since I researched the history of my name (Blog 31). And I have subsequently bought a Mason Tartan kilt – second hand of course!

But maybe they will have the last word as two of the criteria for entry trouble me quite a bit (A belief in one’s own Universal Spirit – God (any flavour will do!) to me and you – as well as being very charitable. Now I do believe in the awesomeness of the universe, and I buy a lot of stuff from the Salvation Army, Dr Barnardo’s, The Heart Foundation, Cancer Research UK, and any number of other charity shops, but I’m sure that’s not what they mean!

The rest of Saturday was a “slob out” day – great! We were up very early on Sunday morning. Elaine was to drive to Edinburgh to pick up her sister, Jacqueline from Australia. Meantime, Ellen, Craig (her boyfriend) and I head out to the Dundee centre for the Creative Arts (DCA) to take advantage of the Sunday morning (matinee) offer of a Film, Coffee and Bacon-butty, all for £6! We have decided on Quentin Tarantino’s, “The Hateful Eight”. As ever, Tarantino doesn’t disappoint, though you’ll have to stay awake for a good three hours to reach the “piece de resistance”!

Hateful Eight

Quentin Tarantino’s “The Hateful Eight”,  Accessed at http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3460252/ on 27 January 2016.

Jacqueline is here mainly to spend time with her daughter and her family who live in London. We all meet for a late brunch at the Balgove Larder café and country produce shop, just outside St Andrews where we avail ourselves of roast beef, Dauphinoise potatoes (though most of us end up with roast ones – they ran out!) and seasonal vegetables. Despite the jet-lag, we all get the benefits of Jacqueline’s descriptions of what she has just left behind in the Antipodes: sun, sea and surf of Sydney! Lucky her, and it brings back memories.

To bring you up to date, on Monday we went back to St Andrews (more shopping) and I visited my GP (Dr M) who advised me on a couple of queries: to keep taking the stomach ulcer medicine, Omeprazole (that PPI, remember?); but to cease taking Finasteride, my medicine used to treat my enlarged prostate gland – hurray! One fewer pill to take every morning.

Finally, yesterday, Tuesday, 26 February, I attended Ninewells Hospital, Dundee for my second Computerised Tomography (CT) scan. On the way in I counted the number of “No Smoking” signs in and around the ‘fresh-air’ garden at the main entrance – no fewer than 28, by the way! Still no effect on the smokers ‘lighting-up’ whilst reading one of them, I despair! I book in and am quickly greeted by an “InHealth” staff member who takes me to a CT scanning room – actually a mobile storage container containing about a million-quid’s-worth of very sophisticated kit including very fast computers that must handle transfers of 5 MB of data per second – billions of 0s and 1s representing 1mm slices of my upper chest through to my lower abdomen. I’ll discuss the results with Dr P at our next meeting in a couple of weeks time just prior to my next round of Combo Chemo Cocktail. Got to admit- I’m excited (if tumours have gone or at least shrunk) and scared (if tumours are still there or new and/or bigger ones have appeared) in equal measure.

Walking back from the makeshift CT facility to the waiting room where Elaine and Jacqueline await I engage briefly with the “InHealth” guy, who informs me that his company is privately-owned, but that the NHS gets a much better deal from them than when the NHS funds these facilities themselves. For example, Ninewell’s waiting list for CT scans is too long for their existing complement of ‘in-house’ facilities but not so long to justify purchase of another machine, a new building in which to house it, and all the vital staffing and maintenance costs (maybe several millions of pounds’ worth of investment). Hence, Ninewells, like many hospitals including large ones like at Dundee, have to rely on ‘privatisation’ to bridge the gap.

My gut reaction is to commence a considered debate (read: have an argument!) about the merits, or otherwise, of NHS privatisation. In principle, I’m against it. However, I bite my tongue, and reflect for a while before just nodding and agreeing how daft it is that the NHS prices itself out its own markets sometimes.

Later, I recall how we had devolved budgets at all the higher education institutions where I have worked. I controlled several millions of Aussie dollars whilst I was at Deakin University in Melbourne. Also, all these universities had very long-winded, complex procedures and rules for purchasing equipment and services. These included using “preferred suppliers” and getting at least three quotations on any proposed purchase of equipment priced above a minimum threshold. Now this is a very frustrating business. Often, the preferred supplier provided the most expensive quotation, and at other times we could nearly always find a supplier via an internet quick search that was the cheapest. We were not supposed to place orders with such companies if they did not appear on the university’s preferred supplier list. How frustrating is that?

Needless to say, I went ahead and authorised purchase of what we needed, at the lowest cost to the university, regardless of our university rules! The rules were either wrong or, at best, out of date, and needed to be revised. Consequently, they deserved to be ignored. I faced the “eventual music” on more than one occasion throughout my career. But if the NHS UK-wide is tied up with similar kinds of red tape, it is no surprise that both ‘insiders’ and ‘government’ believe that there are ‘savings’ to be made in the NHS, though, whose fault it is that these can’t be made by devolving budgets fully to those that manage them on the front line, is beyond my understanding! This ‘problem’ will need to be addressed in my New NHS.

Well, that’s all folks. I promise to chunk my blogs a little more in future, if you’d rather read a little less, but a little more frequently. However, please let me know what you think – via the comments box at the end of this blog.

BUGS001

 

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One thought on “36. Combo chemo – 7 days on and counting, and still not dead yet!

  1. Hi, Colin
    Another good insight into some of the stuff you’re going through, and I’m constantly astonished at your medical lingo, but I suppose you always had that, by dint of your subject discipline. I have a bit of a giggle when I read some of your posts, imagining myself as a student, because as soon as anything that looks like Science (capital S) appears, my brain goes to mince. Lost cause.
    Your description of the Chinese meal preferences is something I can relate to, though – a perfect 11+ question. Now those, I did love. I remember many a happy Friday morning in Primary 7 when we got to practise 11+ tests. Only a handful of the class passed when it came to the real thing, but that’s a whole other ball park. I assume you went through the same process. John, my other half, whom you’ve met (and he has one of the best intellects I’ve come across) failed, so he went to Deepdale Secondary Modern. It took a long time to recover and find his way, via a circuitous route, to HE.
    Anyway, I do think you’re losing the plot again – free masons!!! Help ma boab. I can just imagine your conversations once you’ve joined up – you will really have to keep biting your tongue, I should think. But will they have you? I bet they won’t let you in. They’d chuck you out at the first screening for not having the right views.
    Keep up the good blogging,
    Roni
    x

    Like

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